Know The French Holidays That Means Restaurants Are Closed

French Holidays

You’ve booked a trip to Paris only to discover that all the restaurants are closed? The struggle is real – especially in May, August and well, all dates in-between. It is a way of life for an entire country… the idea that people are not living to work, but working so they can “live.”

You’ve booked a trip to Paris only to discover that all the restaurants are closed? The struggle is real – especially in May, August and well, all dates in-between. It is a way of life for an entire country… the idea that people are not living to work, but working so they can “live.”

One Google search of official French holidays will show you the obvious big days (Labor Day, etc.) but did you know that there is a second calendar you’re not aware of which shows numerous two-week school holidays where the entire family leaves together on vacation? Almost 80 days a year!

In the States, Spring Break and summer holidays means kids doing their own thing or going away for camp, but in France, a school break means parents and children take the two weeks off together. Those parents either own or work at restaurants which means the business closes. Add to that, most school breaks coincide with national holidays. Its why I receive a thousand emails about which restaurants are open on Christmas and New Years when you should be asking where to eat between December 22 and January 7. The restaurants aren’t closed because of two holidays, the entire period is also a school break.

In addition to the restaurants being closed, you need to know this in terms of traveling because it means a mass exodus from the city on Friday night/Saturday morning and a huge amount of people coming back Sunday night/Monday morning.

The entire working and school system revolve around these dates and is no easy task for the French Government to set this calendar – it is quite complicated indeed.

Check these calendars for National Holidays and School Holidays.